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Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
Feb 15, 2013 8:00am PST
to watch these things. and nasa has a near-earth program. it is, i would argue, it is underfunded because of what's at stake here both in the sense of preparedness and dealing with injury and upset. but as to deal with international incidents that might occur. you mentioned the 2002 meteorite over the mediterranean, at the time, the deputy director said if this would have happened over the subcontinent it might have been mistaken for a nuclear explosion in this belligerent stand off between india and pakistan at the time. there are certainly occasions back in the soviet days when the united states and russia mistook natural occurrences for what might have been belligerent events. and so, you have to watch these things. and the nasa near-earth program is important for all of those reasons. as you pointed out, as your other guest pointed out, the energy that's contained in just say small rock, you know, a foot across or a couple of feet across, traveling at these velocities can pack a lot of energy. so when it explodes, it's as if a nuclear explosion went off. obviously, not the radiation a
Feb 15, 2013 11:00am PST
't happen, nasa assures us, is this asteroid and, oh, yes, it has a name, called da 14, they say it will not hit earth. still, you cannot ignore the buzz around this out of this world event. so we have this whole team of reporters for you and analysts to bring you this historic moment. we have a so-called asteroid hunter, former astronaut, coming on live this hour and next to talk about really what will be a historic moment as 2012 da-14 brushes by us earthlings. that will start just about ten minutes from now. right now, i want to go straight to casey wian, live in pasadena, california, nasa's jet propulsion laboratory. and i imagine the excitement is palpable. they're tracking the asteroid. tell me where it is now. >> reporter: well, it is over australia, brooke. they are very excited here at jpl. it is a very, very big day. they have been tracking this asteroid for nearly a year. today is the day it is going to get closest it is going to come to the earth as you mentioned, 17,200 miles. and right now, it is coming from the southern hemisphere, approaching the earth, basically
Feb 15, 2013 9:00am PST
them. so nasa is very good the at finding the much larger ones. but these smaller ones we as humans have not put a lot of effort into it. at the planetary society, we have people that are interested in it and we found this one. >> i want to bring in jason carroll, at the new york museum of natural history. tell us what you're learn building this huge astroid that will get very close to us today. >> well, let me give you some perspective. this meteorite is just about roughly the size of a car, i would say. da-14 which will be swinging by the earth later on this afternoon is about half the size of a football field. so much, much, much larger. and it will be traveling at a rate of about 17,450 miles per hour. that's something like 4.8 miles per second. so it's traveling at an incredible rate. weighs much larger than the meteorite you see behind me here. it will pass by at it closest point about 2:24 p.m. eastern standard time. if you're in indonesia, that is your best vantage point to see. it will be dark there at that particular time. but if you have a telescope, you should be able to
Feb 16, 2013 2:00pm PST
yesterday. nasa calls this a once in a century event. a meteor, pretty sizeable one, as a matter of fact, screamed out of the sky and slammed to earth. more than 1,000 people were hurt and thousands of buildings damaged. cnn's phil black is in russia. he hit the road today, trying to find the spot where the meteor landed. >> are we're walking on a frozen lake. it's about a 90-minute drive west. we're here because locals say a big fragment from the meteor punched through the ice. and is now sitting at the bottom of the lake. [ speaking in russian ] >> that was a very firm no. these police officers said it is prohibited for us to be here, to shoot video here, to try and walk any further. if if part of that meet orrite came down there, where those vehicles are, as locals say it did, the russian authorities don't want us or anyone else to see it. the meteor's final descent through the atmosphere was seen by people all across this region. at this school, students came outside to look at the trail of smoke it left in the sky. one student captured the moment on his phone. what were you thinking
Feb 15, 2013 6:00am PST
the kind of objects that nasa cannot predict ahead of time. they're too small to actually track. the as asteroid that's passing the earth later this afternoon is an object that nasa can pick up ahead of time and can track. by the way, the two events are not related in any way. it's just a chance circumstance that both of these happened on the same day. >> okay. well, let's talk more about this asteroid. as we said, we know that's coming. so every ten years we can expect this sort of thing that happened over russia to happen somewhere in the world and there's not much we can do about it? >> no. there's no way really to predict objects that small coming into the earth atmosphere. tellus museum here is part of the network of nasa set up with fireball cameras. we have several in the southeast. and a few in the west. and this is part of a project, an effort, to track bright meteors. and we track about 8 to 12 bright meteors every night over cartersville. but when we link it with other cameras, we can tell how fast, how high, and even plot where in the solar system these smaller objec
Feb 16, 2013 8:00am PST
scientists can see cosmic rocks coming our way, doing something about it is the tricky part. in theory, nasa would be able to knock a threatening incoming asteroid off orbit so it misses earth. but there's very little precedent for that. the only thing that comes close was a 2005 mission where nasa steered a probe about the size of a coffee table into an oncoming docket, a project known as -- comet, a prooj knoject kn "deep comet." >> with the they're tess should work fine, certainly there would be details in launching a massive object into space, making sure we guide it correctly so it will hit the right spot on the asteroid to knock it appropriately off-course. >> reporter: scientists say these events, the meteor in russia and the asteroid's close call, should be a wake-up call. if the asteroid instead of missing earth had impacted, say, washington, d.c., it would have been devastating. >> if it's dense enough and could hit the earth intact, the impact crater itself would not be that big. but the effects from the shockwave and the heat from impact would be enough to basically wipe out ever
Feb 13, 2013 9:00am PST
're a rocket scientist doesn't mean that you can't rock a hot haircut. we're going to introduce you to nasa's mohawk man. ue psoriasis. i decided enough is enough. ♪ [ spa lady ] i started enbrel. it's clinically proven to provide clearer skin. [ rv guy ] enbrel may not work for everyone -- and may not clear you completely, but for many, it gets skin clearer fast, within 2 months, and keeps it clearer through 6 months. [ male announcer ] enbrel may lower your ability to fight infections. serious, sometimes fatal events, including infections, tuberculosis, lymphoma, other cancers, nervous system and blood disorders, and allergic reactions have occurred. before starting enbrel, your doctor should test you for tuberculosis and discuss whether you've been to a region where certain fungal infections are common. you should not start enbrel if you have an infection like the flu. tell your doctor if you're prone to infections, have cuts or sores, have had hepatitis b, have been treated for heart failure, or if you have symptoms such as persistent fever, bruising, bleeding, or paleness. if you've
Feb 14, 2013 6:00am PST
, a distance that could be cleared in just about 15 minutes. don't get too worried. nasa says the odds of the asteroid hitting the earth are quite low. >>> a big announcement in the business world this morning, u.s. airways and american airlines merging. the new mega carrier will use the american name and be the largest airline in the world. alison kosik is tracking the story and of course all we care about is how this will flekt ticket prices. >> reporter: i hear you. that's what we're all thinking about. we're not going to necessarily see the ticket prices spike when you go to make your airline ticket tomorrow or the next day because mergers don't necessarily cause these spikes in airline fares. historically you look, fares don't go up because mergers happen. in fact, when you adjust these fares for inflation, they've actually been falling, even though it doesn't feel like it. fares have been falling since the 1980s. i want to you listen to travel expert mark murphy. here are some of the benefits of this merger. >> this merger will provide the traveler with better connections. i thin
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)